Cleaning My Dog’s Teeth, All You Need to Know!

October 27, 2016

The good news for dogs is they’re not as prone to cavities as human beings are. But despite the old conventional wisdom that a dog’s mouth is cleaner than a humans, dogs can still develop problems like tartar and plaque buildup and gingivitis. But it’s not just bad breath and yellow teeth you have to worry about. As with humans, these canine dental problems can actually lead to life-threatening infections and issues including heart, liver, and kidney disease. So, I need to know how to clean my dog’s teeth!

Here’s how to practice good dog dental care that will extend your dog’s life:

How to clean my dog’s teeth

If your dog can brush his own teeth, you can stop reading this article and start posting the video to YouTube. For the rest of us, we have to use a canine toothbrush and a little strategy to clean our dog’s teeth. The best brush to use is double-headed with the brushes at a 45 degree angle to clean below the gum line, like those we carry in our store.

Your dog might not go for the tooth brushing at first, but you can make it a pleasant experience for both of you. Try and choose a time when your dog has had plenty of exercise, so he’s more inclined to sit still. Don’t overdo it the first few times. Start slowly and quit if your dog gets agitated, even if you don’t brush the whole mouth. You can increase the time every day as he gets used to it. Also, make sure to speak soothingly during the brushing. And always reward your dog with a treat afterwards! Before too long, your dog should start looking forward to the event.

How to clean my dog’s teeth …. Start early with your dog as a puppy!

Grown dogs can learn to become comfortable with dog teeth cleaning, but make things easier for yourself by working with your dog as a puppy.

How to pick the right tooth paste for your dog

This is very important. Do NOT use regular human toothpaste for your dog. Most human toothpastes include fluoride, which is extremely poisonous to dogs. You can find toothpaste formulated for dogs at our store to clean our dog’s teeth.

Dry food is better than soft food

If the tooth brushing ends in blood, sweat, or tears, there are still choices you can make to help improve your dog’s oral health. Crunchy kibble is better for your dog’s teeth than soft food, as soft food is more likely to stick to the teeth and cause decay.

Chew bones and chew toys to clean teeth

There are many synthetic bones and chew toys that are specially designed to strengthen your dog’s gums and teeth. Just make sure you’re providing safe objects for your dog to chew on. Hard objects can cause broken teeth.

Giving your dog a good bone to chew on can help get rid of buildup and keep teeth strong, but imagine a human who only chews gum and uses mouth rinse. That’s not an effective means of ensuring good dental hygiene and overall health. The same is true for your dog.

How often to see a vet?

Even with healthy teeth, your dog should have his teeth checked by a professional every six to twelve months. Your vet should include a dental examination with a normal checkup, but ask for it if they don’t.

Dental care can be a hassle for dogs, but proper maintenance can be a money saver in the long run. Letting it go can lead to costly and often painful vet visits down the road. Many dogs have to be given anesthesia to have their teeth and gums cleaned if the buildup is bad enough. Keep your dog’s mouth clean though, and you’ll both be smiling!

Here at Petland, we carry a wide variety of dental products for both dogs and cats. We believe it is very important to get off on the right foot with taking care of your animals’ teeth. That’s why dental care is thoroughly explained with every puppy that goes home from our store! We also carry dental treats and toys that can help in between cleanings and brushings for both puppies and adult dogs!

Not seeing what you are looking for? Let’s start by giving you a $100.00 off your puppy by making an appointment today.

Click here to start